Friday, August 18, 2006

Republican Support for Historically Black Colleges

In the United States, Historically Black Colleges And Universities (HBCU) (a type of minority-serving institution or MSI) are colleges or universities that were established before 1964 with the intention of serving the African American community. Prior to 1964, African-Americans were almost always excluded from higher education opportunities at the predominantly white colleges and universities—with notable exceptions such as the integrated Hillsdale College in Michigan(today a conservative college) and Oberlin College in Ohio.

There are more than 100 historically black colleges in the United States, located almost exclusively in the southern and eastern states. Four HBCUs are located in the midwestern states (two each in Missouri and Ohio), while one is in the Virgin Islands.

Below are the contributions of Republican presidents to Republican Support for Historically Black Colleges.

1)President Ronald Reagan created the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities, which encourages federal support for HBCUs. Indeed, historically black colleges and universities also enjoyed a higher public profile since the 1980s.

2)In 1989, President George Bush signed Executive Order 12677. This Executive Order established a Presidential Advisory Board on Historically Black Colleges and Universities to advise the President and the Secretary of Education on methods, programs, and strategies to strengthen these valued institutions.

3)On February 12, 2002, President George W. Bush signed Executive Order 13256. This Executive Order transferred the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities to the Office of the Secretary within the U.S. Department of Education.

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